I'm Pam Newman.

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I'm a writer of aricles, poems & songs. Here's some cool stuff I wrote.

From the article:

[…] it is a story that needs to be told. The documentary “Afro-Punk” did a great job of opening the initial door that allows people of color to show their underground stripes. However, as a woman, there is more to say, and Dawes does service to this by offering a beginning look into the female perspective of being attracted to and participating in the metal, hardcore and punk scenes.

Presently reading “It’s bigger than Hip Hop.”

Also presently drooling over M K Asante Jr’s fine, intelligent ass.

ca-thar-sis:

thescienceofreality:

As it’s becoming more apparent that we can’t get our hands on enough free educational books, courses, and more, I’m receiving an increasingly steady stream of submissions and suggestions on additional resources not yet addressed. FreeScience is one of the best I’ve seen so far. Who doesn’t love free books? Especially free science books!? Enjoy this list of 2000+ science-related books, ready to download and read at the push of a button, for your personal mind expansion! 

And if you have any other great self-education resources, let me know!

Scientists everywhere in their most desperate voice: PLEASE, PEOPLE, FOR THE LOVE OF ALL THAT IS GOOD! READ!!! HERE! *throws books* TAKE THEM ALL. *throws more books* TAKE THEM ALL FOR FREE—I DON’T EVEN CARE ANYMORE. *still throwing books*

More on strengths

So, not so much now that I’ve reached the fine age of 31 and 1/2, but definitely in my twenties: Those personality quizzes were really important.

I felt like that in my twenties I was really trying to figure out who the hell I was, and what my purpose was. The ability to take a quiz with some general outlines of how I function was very helpful. 

So what I’m saying is, that if you’re between 19 and 30, you should follow the link in that last post, and look for those books on Amazon. You’ll find  out some interesting things, and I think you may even find new ways to be an expert at being you.

pengpenguins:

A list of radical literature by/about WOC.

It’s so hot that my sweat was sweating. 
However, the library is nice and cool… and actually the library is where the cool kids hang out, so I’m in the right place.
BOOKS!

It’s so hot that my sweat was sweating. 

However, the library is nice and cool… and actually the library is where the cool kids hang out, so I’m in the right place.

BOOKS!

blackqueerdo:

next book purchase!
 
The Book (from the website)

Rosa Parks was often described as a sweet and reticent elderly woman whose tired feet caused her to defy segregation on Montgomery’s city buses, and whose supposedly solitary, spontaneous act sparked the 1955 bus boycott that gave birth to the civil rights movement.
The truth of who Rosa Parks was and what really lay beneath the 1955 boycott is far different from anything previously written.
In this groundbreaking and important book, Danielle McGuire writes about the rape in 1944 of a twenty-four-year-old mother and sharecropper, Recy Taylor, who strolled toward home after an evening of singing and praying at the Rock Hill Holiness Church in Abbeville, Alabama. Seven white men, armed with knives and shotguns, ordered the young woman into their green Chevrolet, raped her, and left her for dead. The president of the local NAACP branch office sent his best investigator and organizer to Abbeville. Her name was Rosa Parks. In taking on this case, Parks launched a movement that ultimately changed the world.
The author gives us the never-before-told history of how the civil rights movement began; how it was in part started in protest against the ritualistic rape of black women by white men who used economic intimidation, sexual violence, and terror to derail the freedom movement; and how those forces persisted unpunished throughout the Jim Crow era when white men assaulted black women to enforce rules of racial and economic hierarchy. Black women’s protests against sexual assault and interracial rape fueled civil rights campaigns throughout the South that began during World War II and went through to the Black Power movement. The Montgomery bus boycott was the baptism, not the birth, of that struggle.
At the Dark End of the Street describes the decades of degradation black women on the Montgomery city buses endured on their way to cook and clean for their white bosses. It reveals how Rosa Parks, by 1955 one of the most radical activists in Alabama, had had enough. “There had to be a stopping place,” she said, “and this seemed to be the place for me to stop being pushed around.” Parks refused to move from her seat on the bus, was arrested, and, with fierce activist Jo Ann Robinson, organized a one-day bus boycott.
The protest, intended to last twenty-four hours, became a yearlong struggle for dignity and justice. It broke the back of the Montgomery city bus lines and bankrupted the company.
We see how and why Rosa Parks, instead of becoming a leader of the movement she helped to start, was turned into a symbol of virtuous black womanhood, sainted and celebrated for her quiet dignity, prim demeanor, and middle-class propriety—her radicalism all but erased. And we see as well how thousands of black women whose courage and fortitude helped to transform America were reduced to the footnotes of history.
A controversial, moving, and courageous book; narrative history at its best.

blackqueerdo:

next book purchase!

The Book (from the website)

Rosa Parks was often described as a sweet and reticent elderly woman whose tired feet caused her to defy segregation on Montgomery’s city buses, and whose supposedly solitary, spontaneous act sparked the 1955 bus boycott that gave birth to the civil rights movement.

The truth of who Rosa Parks was and what really lay beneath the 1955 boycott is far different from anything previously written.

In this groundbreaking and important book, Danielle McGuire writes about the rape in 1944 of a twenty-four-year-old mother and sharecropper, Recy Taylor, who strolled toward home after an evening of singing and praying at the Rock Hill Holiness Church in Abbeville, Alabama. Seven white men, armed with knives and shotguns, ordered the young woman into their green Chevrolet, raped her, and left her for dead. The president of the local NAACP branch office sent his best investigator and organizer to Abbeville. Her name was Rosa Parks. In taking on this case, Parks launched a movement that ultimately changed the world.

The author gives us the never-before-told history of how the civil rights movement began; how it was in part started in protest against the ritualistic rape of black women by white men who used economic intimidation, sexual violence, and terror to derail the freedom movement; and how those forces persisted unpunished throughout the Jim Crow era when white men assaulted black women to enforce rules of racial and economic hierarchy. Black women’s protests against sexual assault and interracial rape fueled civil rights campaigns throughout the South that began during World War II and went through to the Black Power movement. The Montgomery bus boycott was the baptism, not the birth, of that struggle.

At the Dark End of the Street describes the decades of degradation black women on the Montgomery city buses endured on their way to cook and clean for their white bosses. It reveals how Rosa Parks, by 1955 one of the most radical activists in Alabama, had had enough. “There had to be a stopping place,” she said, “and this seemed to be the place for me to stop being pushed around.” Parks refused to move from her seat on the bus, was arrested, and, with fierce activist Jo Ann Robinson, organized a one-day bus boycott.

The protest, intended to last twenty-four hours, became a yearlong struggle for dignity and justice. It broke the back of the Montgomery city bus lines and bankrupted the company.

We see how and why Rosa Parks, instead of becoming a leader of the movement she helped to start, was turned into a symbol of virtuous black womanhood, sainted and celebrated for her quiet dignity, prim demeanor, and middle-class propriety—her radicalism all but erased. And we see as well how thousands of black women whose courage and fortitude helped to transform America were reduced to the footnotes of history.

A controversial, moving, and courageous book; narrative history at its best.

Have you read more than 6 of these books? The BBC believes most people will have read only 6 of the 100 books listed here…

khareen:

Bold those books you’ve read in their entirety.

Italicize the ones you started but didn’t finish or read only an excerpt.

Pride and Prejudice – Jane Austen
The Lord of the Rings – JRR Tolkien
3 Jane Eyre – Charlotte Bronte
4 Harry Potter series – J K Rowling
5 To Kill a Mockingbird – Harper Lee
6 The Bible
7 Wuthering Heights – Emily Bronte
8 Nineteen Eighty Four – George Orwell
9 His Dark Materials – Philip Pullman
10 Great Expectations – Charles Dickens
11 Little Women – Louisa M Alcott
12 Tess of the D’Urbervilles – Thomas Hardy
13 Catch 22 – Joseph Heller
14 Complete Works of Shakespeare
15 Rebecca – Daphne Du Maurier
16 The Hobbit – JRR Tolkien
17 Birdsong – Sebastian Faulks
18 Catcher in the Rye – JD Salinger
19 The Time Traveller’s Wife – Audrey Niffenegger
20 Middlemarch – George Eliot
21 Gone With The Wind – Margaret Mitchell
22 The Great Gatsby – F Scott Fitzgerald
23 Bleak House – Charles Dickens
24 War and Peace – Leo Tolstoy
25 The Hitch Hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy – Douglas Adams
26 Brideshead Revisited – Evelyn Waugh
27 Crime and Punishment – Fyodor Dostoyevsky
28 Grapes of Wrath – John Steinbeck
29 Alice in Wonderland – Lewis Carroll
30 The Wind in the Willows – Kenneth Grahame
31 Anna Karenina – Leo Tolstoy
32 David Copperfield – Charles Dickens
33 Chronicles of Narnia – CS Lewis
34 Emma – Jane Austen
35 Persuasion – Jane Austen
36 The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe – CS Lewis
37 The Kite Runner – Khaled Hosseini
38 Captain Corelli’s Mandolin – Louis De Bernieres
39 Memoirs of a Geisha – Arthur Golden
40 Winnie the Pooh – AA Milne
41 Animal Farm – George Orwell
42 The Da Vinci Code – Dan Brown
43 One Hundred Years of Solitude – Gabriel Garcia Marquez
44 A Prayer for Owen Meaney – John Irving
45 The Woman in White – Wilkie Collins
46 Anne of Green Gables – LM Montgomery
47 Far From The Madding Crowd – Thomas Hardy
48 The Handmaid’s Tale – Margaret Atwood
49 Lord of the Flies – William Golding
50 Atonement – Ian McEwan
51 Life of Pi – Yann Martel
52 Dune – Frank Herbert
53 Cold Comfort Farm – Stella Gibbons
54 Sense and Sensibility – Jane Austen
55 A Suitable Boy – Vikram Seth
56 The Shadow of the Wind – Carlos Ruiz Zafon
57 A Tale Of Two Cities – Charles Dickens
58 Brave New World – Aldous Huxley
59 The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time – Mark Haddon
60 Love In The Time Of Cholera – Gabriel Garcia Marquez
61 Of Mice and Men – John Steinbeck
62 Lolita – Vladimir Nabokov
63 The Secret History – Donna Tartt
64 The Lovely Bones – Alice Sebold
65 Count of Monte Cristo – Alexandre Dumas
66 On The Road – Jack Kerouac
67 Jude the Obscure – Thomas Hardy
68 Bridget Jones’s Diary – Helen Fielding
69 Midnight’s Children – Salman Rushdie
70 Moby Dick – Herman Melville
71 Oliver Twist – Charles Dickens
72 Dracula – Bram Stoker
73 The Secret Garden – Frances Hodgson Burnett
74 Notes From A Small Island – Bill Bryson
75 Ulysses – James Joyce
76 The Bell Jar – Sylvia Plath
77 Swallows and Amazons – Arthur Ransome
78 Germinal – Emile Zola
79 Vanity Fair – William Makepeace Thackeray
80 Possession – AS Byatt
81 A Christmas Carol – Charles Dickens
82 Cloud Atlas – David Mitchel
83 The Color Purple – Alice Walker
84 The Remains of the Day – Kazuo Ishiguro
85 Madame Bovary – Gustave Flaubert
86 A Fine Balance – Rohinton Mistry
87 Charlotte’s Web – EB White
88 The Five People You Meet In Heaven – Mitch Albom
89 Adventures of Sherlock Holmes – Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
90 The Faraway Tree Collection – Enid Blyton
91 Heart of Darkness – Joseph Conrad
92 The Little Prince – Antoine De Saint-Exupery
93 The Wasp Factory – Iain Banks
94 Watership Down – Richard Adams
95 A Confederacy of Dunces – John Kennedy Toole
96 A Town Like Alice – Nevil Shute
97 The Three Musketeers – Alexandre Dumas
98 Hamlet – William Shakespeare
99 Charlie and the Chocolate Factory – Roald Dahl
100 Les Miserables – Victor Hugo

Who are the people who’ve only read 6 of these? Most are required reading. Also, it’s not fair that the trilogy/series books are listed as only one!

(Source: khrn17)

[EDIT] It’s a Neil Gaiman book (The title is in the link url, duh)

[EDIT] It’s a Neil Gaiman book (The title is in the link url, duh)

I finally got around to reading Perks of Being a Wallflower

A friend was giving away some of her books maybe 8 months ago, and I picked that one out of the pile. I just got around to reading it like 2 days ago. 

Since I am 14 going on 30, it was quite an important experience. I liked it. It was a little over the top. However, I think that’s what teenagers need/are going through. It made me think about some fucked up shit, but without having an episode over it. That was important for me at this slice of time & space.

I wish I had read it when it first came out in like 1993 or whatever, and I was closer to an ideal age for it. At the time I didn’t give a shit about any books that were not among the following flavors:

  1. Nonfiction
  2. Female central character (if it wasn’t one of the below, I totally discriminated against male leads until I was, like 20)
  3. Fantasy
  4. Science Fiction
  5. Comics
  6. Manga
  7. The Baby Sitters Club

Also, lol MTV Books. Do they even make books anymore or are they just magazines about reality show stars? [BURN!]

Life is like a really good book

Sometimes I want to skip the boring/filler/yawn parts so I can get straight to the juicy bits.

Mermaid - A twist on the Classic Tale by Carolyn Turgeon
I read this book last night. The whole thing.
It’s like 230 some odd pages of normal sized text. It’s not some great feat. It has been years since I read an entire book in one sitting. I’ll do everyone a solid and not write any serious spoilers.
Mermaid is a pretty good story. This story is totally a fairy tale. Stereotypical storybook fare include a mermaid princess, a people princess, magic, a hot dude and awesome castles. There’s also a fair share of sex, blood & a sprinkle of masturbation on top.
Bam! Grown-up fairy tale.
It’s not the Disney setup where there’s a bad guy/gal who’s out to get revenge or take over the world, which was nice. The characters develop their own internal conflicts which would make any bad guy superfluous and boring.
There are times when the story gains some kind of stoner-like awareness  and tries sneaking in some weird introspection. Then every time, like a drunken moment of clarity, the story seems to remember it’s a fairy tale right before eyes start to roll. The narrative always flips back to love, infatuation and mer-people magic once the story realizes it’s taking itself too seriously.
I liked it and will probably see the movie whenever it comes out. I would recommend this book to grown ups who have ever collected Sanrio stuff, liked Wicked (it’s not as good as Wicked) and/or drink light beer.

Mermaid - A twist on the Classic Tale by Carolyn Turgeon

I read this book last night. The whole thing.

It’s like 230 some odd pages of normal sized text. It’s not some great feat. It has been years since I read an entire book in one sitting. I’ll do everyone a solid and not write any serious spoilers.

Mermaid is a pretty good story. This story is totally a fairy tale. Stereotypical storybook fare include a mermaid princess, a people princess, magic, a hot dude and awesome castles. There’s also a fair share of sex, blood & a sprinkle of masturbation on top.

Bam! Grown-up fairy tale.

It’s not the Disney setup where there’s a bad guy/gal who’s out to get revenge or take over the world, which was nice. The characters develop their own internal conflicts which would make any bad guy superfluous and boring.

There are times when the story gains some kind of stoner-like awareness  and tries sneaking in some weird introspection. Then every time, like a drunken moment of clarity, the story seems to remember it’s a fairy tale right before eyes start to roll. The narrative always flips back to love, infatuation and mer-people magic once the story realizes it’s taking itself too seriously.

I liked it and will probably see the movie whenever it comes out. I would recommend this book to grown ups who have ever collected Sanrio stuff, liked Wicked (it’s not as good as Wicked) and/or drink light beer.