I'm Pam Newman.

I am awesome every day & you are too.

Ask me!

Follow my butt on Twitter!

I'm a writer of aricles, poems & songs. Here's some cool stuff I wrote.

I strongly believe that our next biggest civil rights movement, within the African American community, is equal education.

On the right hand there are folks talking about abolishing the department of education and still others on the left, discussing what it means to have equal education.

The education gap is a real thing, and if you don’t know about it, I suggest you do a bit of Googling. Find out what the difference is in “Good” schools between the white children and the children of color.

I don’t even believe I have to type this out, but for real, some people don’t get it: The gap does not exist because children of color can’t learn. (I feel like I just told you that there are 26 letters in the alphabet…) This is because teachers, and other adults who work in schools, treat kids differently within their classrooms.

You know… the constitution, nor any of its amendments, does not guarantee equal education to every American who wants one?

Nope, not even a mention about educating people.

The public education system, as a function of government, is actually a relatively new thing. I’m thinking that We The People ought to demand a constitutional amendment that garuntees a quality education, competitive with the rest of the planet for every child who’s family wants to go through the government’s public education system.

Just sayin.

This outrageous overreaction by the Oakland Police Department at Occupy Oakland today reminded me that history repeats itself.
Occupy Oakland, your strife is not in vain. We will all work together in solidarity and change this system!

This outrageous overreaction by the Oakland Police Department at Occupy Oakland today reminded me that history repeats itself.

Occupy Oakland, your strife is not in vain. We will all work together in solidarity and change this system!

blackgirlphresh:

coolchicksfromhistory:

Ruby Bridges, the little girl who integrated New Orleans public schools, meets with President Obama. 

ruby… one of the fearless ones.

Chills.

Also, think about how young this woman is. 1960 was only a half a century ago.

Ms. Bridges walked into an empty school building for first grade because of the color of her skin within the lifetime of many other living people.

When people say racism is dead, or that nobody thinks about color at all - consider Ms. Bridges story and life, and the people who opposed her attending school that day who are still alive, contributing to society and voting. Think about the children they’ve raised and how they think about society. Some of them may create the laws that effect our lives.

Our job is to diligently maintain dignity for ourselves, demand respect and prove that skin color is physical through our actions. We are all people who share a common bond.